AFTER Premier Christy Clark said multiple times she was considering bringing back a value added tax like the HST, she quickly attempted to backtrack in the face of increasing pressure on Monday, the NDP pointed out on Tuesday.
After Clark gave two opposing positions in less than two hours, anti-HST leader and former Premier Bill Vander Zalm wasn’t buying it:
“The VAT, the HST, they are the same thing. Of course they are going to do it – the business community wants it. But they won’t say anything before the election.” (to Globe and Mail, May 1)
“We can’t trust the government, they’ve lied to us so many times… I’ll be there to fight it again.” (on Jon McComb Show, May 2nd)
And Christy Clark’s corporate backers have already started calling on her to bring back a value added tax, despite her last minute promise not to.
BC Chamber of Commerce President Val Litwin was asked whether he thought Clark should ignore her promise and bring back a value added tax. He said: “certainly I hope the intent is there.” (Jon McComb Show, May 2)
Greg D’Avignon, president of the Business Council of BC – the organization leading the charge to implement a new value added tax that will shift billions in taxes from businesses to people – suggested Clark should still bring in a VAT, telling the Globe that he hopes the next government will be open to a broader tax reform agenda.
A value added tax would shift taxes from business to people and would cost the typical family $1,000 more each year.
The NDP said that British Columbians deserve some answers from Christy Clark:

  1. After saying multiple times that you’re considering bringing back a value added tax, why did you change your answer?
  2. How is your new promise any different from the one your party broke in 2009?
  3. A value added tax would mean a multi-billion dollar tax shift from business to people. Are you hiding your plans from British Columbians because you know they don’t support that?