FEWER than 2-in-10 Canadians (14%) approve of the 2017 budget, in a random sampling of public opinion taken by the Forum Poll amongst 1029 Canadian voters.

Four-in-10 (40%) disapprove of the budget, while just over a third (36%) have no opinion, with (10%) responding they do not know.

Those most likely to approve of the budget include Canadians living in the Atlantic Provinces (20%), supporting the Liberal party (31%), and with a post graduate degree (20%).

Those most likely to disapprove of the budget include respondents aged 55 to 64 (45%), males (47%), earning $80,000-$100,000 (49%) or $100,000-$250,000 (49%), living in Alberta (55%), and supporting the Conservative Party (69%).

 

Just over 4-in-10 are less likely to vote Liberal because of the budget

 

Forty-three per cent say they are less likely to vote Liberal in 2019, with 31% saying the budget will have no effect, and 12% responding that they are more likely to vote Liberal. Thirteen per cent say they don’t know.

Those more inclined to vote Liberal include the oldest (65 and older: 15%), the least wealthy (22%), the least educated (17%), and the most educated (16%).

Those less inclined to vote Liberal include ages 35-44 (49%) or 55-64% (50%), males (48%), earning $40,000-$60,000 (48%) or $100,000-$250,000 (50%), living in Alberta (57%), and with some college or university (47%) or a college or university degree.

 

More than a third (37%) see the budget as bad for the economy

 

Only 15% see the budget as good for the economy, with 31% having no opinion, 17% don’t know, and 37% say it will be bad for the economy.

 

Budget not good for middle class

 

A strong plurality (41%) believe that the budget will have a negative effect on the middle class. Ten per cent respond its effects will be positive, while 31% say it will be neutral and 19% respond they don’t know.

Those most likely to respond that it will have a positive effect include the youngest (13%) and the oldest (12%), living in Atlantic Canada (17%), and supporting the Liberal Party (19%). Negativity for the budget was common to those aged 35-44 (47%) or 45-54 (44%), earning $80,000-$100,000 (55%), living in Manitoba / Saskatchewan (50%), and those with a college or university degree.

 

Parts of the budget are appreciated

 

On the dissolution of Canada Savings Bonds, the plurality had no opinion (35%), suggesting the issue didn’t resonate with many. Slightly more (26%) oppose their abandonment than support it (21%), with 19% saying they don’t know.

The government’s new investment into childcare is supported by the majority (52%) of respondents, while 22% oppose it, and 18% have no opinion, with only 8% saying they do not know. Support of the childcare investment is common to the youngest (34%), females (55%), Liberal voters (65%), NDP voters(66%), and Green Party voters (68%), and those with a post-graduate degree (66%).

A strong plurality (46%) support the increased taxes on alcohol in Canada, while 31% oppose the move, 19% have no opinion, and 4% do not know.  Support is common to the oldest (53%), residents of Saskatchewan / Manitoba (60%), and Liberal supporters (62%).

The move to eliminate the tax credits on transit passes was seen negatively with more than a third (37%) opposing the decision. Only 16% support it, with 26% having no opinion and 18% saying they don’t know. Opposition is common to the youngest (40%) and aged 35-44 (43%), and living in BC (46%).

Almost half (49%) support increased parental leave, while 25% oppose, with 20% having no opinion, and 5% responding they do not know. The youngest (67%), females (52%), Green Party supporters (70%), and those with a post-graduate degree (55%) are most likely to support the plan.

On the limitations of unpaid internships, a third (33%) support the restrictions, while 31% have no opinion, with 15% opposed, and 21% saying they do not know.

Almost half (49%) of respondents believe that adding GST / HST to ride sharing services such as Uber is a good move, while 24% oppose it, with 19% having no opinion, and only 8% responding they do not know. Support is common to males (56%), those earning $60,000-$80,000 (61%) or $100,000-$250,000 (61%), and living in Québec (61%).

“Public opinion suggests the Liberals should have done better with their budget. While there are some measures that are hits such as the childcare investments and parental leave, there are some measures that are misses such as scrapping the transit credit. Even though a good deal of the component parts are viewed favourably, in general, Canadians are taking a very dim view to the Liberals’ 2017 budget,” said Dr. Lorne Bozinoff, President of Forum Research, on Saturday.