Donors fund big needs at Royal Columbian Hospital

Dr. Sue Sidhu is among the surgeons at Royal Columbian Hospital who can fix severely broken ribs by using a new instrument purchased through donations to Royal Columbian Hospital Foundation.

DONORS to Royal Columbian Hospital Foundation have combined to fund more than $600,000 in extra equipment for the hospital, following a special round of purchases.

The new equipment reflects some of the hospital’s biggest needs, benefitting several medical departments. Funding comes from numerous donations made to Royal Columbian Hospital Foundation for greatest needs.

The hospital’s lab department will benefit from two items that are vital for cancer treatment. The lab’s Anatomic Pathology division is getting new equipment to help with testing involving cancers such as those found in the breast, lungs and brain. In addition, the Medical Biochemistry division will obtain a new analyzer for protein testing, which helps monitor the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatment.

The Variety Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) will add a specialized incubator that provides an optimal environment to help the neurodevelopment of newborns. This will be especially useful for babies who are born premature by 11 weeks or more.

The operating room will gain new instruments that allow surgeons to treat trauma patients who have severely broken ribs. These flail chest injuries may be fixed by surgically implanting specially-designed titanium plates.

Doctors in the Intensive Care Unit can rely on a flexible video scope to look inside patients’ lungs, which will help to diagnose and treat potentially life-threatening problems. Meanwhile, the hospital will be able to increase the availability of cystoscopes that help diagnose bladder problems, thanks to new sterilization equipment.

The Pediatrics department will be able to monitor the vital signs of infants and children who undergo procedures in the unit’s treatment room. This will help identify when these patients may need extra support.

Getting patients out of bed and moving again is key to their recovery, and physiotherapists and rehab assistants can use a new mobile lift to support the posture and balance of critically ill or injured patients as they get used to walking again.

Patients who need basic equipment as they transition from the hospital back to their homes will have access to new inventory including walkers, wheelchairs, and bed rails. The Occupational Therapy department manages a loan cupboard that includes hundreds of items.

Royal Columbian is the only hospital in BC with trauma, cardiac, neurosciences, high-risk maternity and neonatal intensive care on one site. It also looks after some of the most seriously ill and injured patients, and they do it with the support of donors.

Since 1978, donors to Royal Columbian Hospital Foundation have helped fund priority equipment needs, facility enhancements, research, education and innovation at Royal Columbian Hospital.

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