Vancouver resident Yao Wei Wu has settled his civil lawsuit against the City of Vancouver and two Vancouver police officers. Wu was brutally assaulted by two Vancouver Police Department officers at the front door of his house on January 21, 2010.

Wu’s supporters, known as the Concerned Group, report that Wu will only say the matter is no longer before the Supreme Court. Wu is not able to provide any details of any out-of-court settlement he may have reached with the City. A 20-day jury trial had been set to commence October 9, 2012.

Wu says he and his family received a huge outpouring of generosity following news of the assault, and he wishes to thank the public and the media for their attention to his case. Concerned Group member Gabriel Yiu, who has been assisting Wu since the incident, reports Wu appears to be satisfied with the conclusion of this lawsuit.

Wu thanks the Concerned Group, as well as his lawyers Neil Chantler and Cameron Ward, for their assistance throughout this ordeal. “At my most helpless moment following my injury,” says Mr. Wu, “the Concerned Group came to my aid and advocated on my behalf. They got me the best lawyers and helped provide my family with psychological counselling. My family and I are extremely grateful for their help.”

Yiu says this case shook the community, particularly Vancouver’s immigrant community. Lawyer Neil Chantler says “this case seemed to resonate with all Vancouverites. Perhaps we could all relate to the horror of having an incident like this happen on our front doorstep.”

The Concerned Group says a total of $6,800.75 was raised by the community for the Wu family following the incident. The Concerned Group and Mr. Wu have agreed that this money will be donated to the BC Civil Liberties Association for the designated purpose of assisting victims in similar incidents. BCCLA Executive Director David Eby thanked the Concerned Group for the donation, which will be used in part to set up a Chinese language web page for the BCCLA.

Wu’s case shined a spotlight on the current police complaints system, which took 10 months to investigate the incident and ultimately exonerated the two police officers. That conclusion caused such outcry that the Police Complaints Commissioner ordered a public hearing to review the investigation. The Commissioner’s order for a public hearing was successfully challenged by the two police officers, and the issue of whether a public hearing will occur is currently under appeal.